Rodrigo
Usuario desde: 12 Julio 2010
CONTACTO
Rodrigo Herrera Vegas

Buenos Aires
Argentina
REPUTACIÓN
100% positiva
(2) Operaciones
CATEGORÍAS DEL EXPERTO

Propuesta paneles para Veronica 20 personas

Solar lighting

Daylighting features such as this oculusat the top of the Pantheon, in Rome, Italy have been in use since antiquity.

The history of lighting is dominated by the use of natural light. The Romans recognized a right to light as early as the 6th century and English law echoed these judgments with the Prescription Act of 1832.[30][31] In the 20th century artificial lighting became the main source of interior illumination but daylighting techniques and hybrid solar lighting solutions are ways to reduce energy consumption.

Daylighting systems collect and distribute sunlight to provide interior illumination. This passive technology directly offsets energy use by replacing artificial lighting, and indirectly offsets non-solar energy use by reducing the need for air-conditioning.[32] Although difficult to quantify, the use of natural lighting also offers physiological and psychological benefits compared to artificial lighting.[32] Daylighting design implies careful selection of window types, sizes and orientation; exterior shading devices may be considered as well. Individual features include sawtooth roofs, clerestory windows, light shelves, skylights and light tubes. They may be incorporated into existing structures, but are most effective when integrated into a solar design package that accounts for factors such as glare, heat flux and time-of-use. When daylighting features are properly implemented they can reduce lighting-related energy requirements by 25%.[33]

Hybrid solar lighting is an active solar method of providing interior illumination. HSL systems collect sunlight using focusing mirrors that track the Sun and use optical fibers to transmit it inside the building to supplement conventional lighting. In single-story applications these systems are able to transmit 50% of the direct sunlight received.[34]

Solar lights that charge during the day and light up at dusk are a common sight along walkways.[citation needed]

Although daylight saving time is promoted as a way to use sunlight to save energy, recent research has been limited and reports contradictory results: several studies report savings, but just as many suggest no effect or even a net loss, particularly when gasoline consumption is taken into account. Electricity use is greatly affected by geography, climate and economics, making it hard to generalize from single studies.[35]

Solar thermal

Solar thermal technologies can be used for water heating, space heating, space cooling and process heat generation.[36]

Water heating

Solar water heaters facing the Sun to maximize gain.

Solar hot water systems use sunlight to heat water. In low geographical latitudes (below 40 degrees) from 60 to 70% of the domestic hot water use with temperatures up to 60 °C can be provided by solar heating systems.[37]The most common types of solar water heaters are evacuated tube collectors (44%) and glazed flat plate collectors (34%) generally used for domestic hot water; and unglazed plastic collectors (21%) used mainly to heat swimming pools.[38]

As of 2007, the total installed capacity of solar hot water systems is approximately 154 GW.[39] China is the world leader in their deployment with 70 GW installed as of 2006 and a long term goal of 210 GW by 2020.[40] Israel andCyprus are the per capita leaders in the use of solar hot water systems with over 90% of homes using them.[41] In the United States, Canada and Australia heating swimming pools is the dominant application of solar hot water with an installed capacity of 18 GW as of 2005.[16]

Heating, cooling and ventilation

Solar House #1 of Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the United States, built in 1939, used seasonal thermal storagefor year-round heating.

In the United States, heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems account for 30% (4.65 EJ) of the energy used in commercial buildings and nearly 50% (10.1 EJ) of the energy used in residential buildings.[33][42]Solar heating, cooling and ventilation technologies can be used to offset a portion of this energy.

Thermal mass is any material that can be used to store heat—heat from the Sun in the case of solar energy. Common thermal mass materials include stone, cement and water. Historically they have been used in arid climates or warm temperate regions to keep buildings cool by absorbing solar energy during the day and radiating stored heat to the cooler atmosphere at night. However they can be used in cold temperate areas to maintain warmth as well. The size and placement of thermal mass depend on several factors such as climate, daylighting and shading conditions. When properly incorporated, thermal mass maintains space temperatures in a comfortable range and reduces the need for auxiliary heating and cooling equipment.[43]

A solar chimney (or thermal chimney, in this context) is a passive solar ventilation system composed of a vertical shaft connecting the interior and exterior of a building. As the chimney warms, the air inside is heated causing anupdraft that pulls air through the building. Performance can be improved by using glazing and thermal mass materials in a way that mimics greenhouses.[citation needed]

Deciduous trees and plants have been promoted as a means of controlling solar heating and cooling. When planted on the southern side of a building, their leaves provide shade during the summer, while the bare limbs allow light to pass during the winter.[44] Since bare, leafless trees shade 1/3 to 1/2 of incident solar radiation, there is a balance between the benefits of summer shading and the corresponding loss of winter heating.[45] In climates with significant heating loads, deciduous trees should not be planted on the southern side of a building because they will interfere with winter solar availability. They can, however, be used on the east and west sides to provide a degree of summer shading without appreciably affecting winter solar gain.[46]

FOTOS DEL PROYECTO
El uso de este sitio web implica la aceptación de los Términos y Condiciones
y de las y de las Políticas de Privacidad
┬ę 2010 SUSTENTATOR EXPERTS   |   Powered by F5